Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Making Bears for Carry the Future

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Today I finally, finally got to finishing some stuffed bears I had been planning on making for Carry the Future.

Last August, I was nominated for the Leibster award by Sharon, of the blog Leadership2Mommyship. In my post One Lovely Blog Award & Leibster Award I shared that I was totally in love with an organization called Carry the Future that gives aide and baby carriers to refugees, especially those in the Middle East.

They had a great need for certain items, and while I have slightly limited resources, I do like to sew. I saw that Carry the Future was partnering with Dolls of Hope, which made simple doll and bear patterns available for anyone interested.

(I decided on the bear pattern because it looked easier.)

Not too long ago, I actually downloaded the pattern, planned the project and then went to Wal-Mart to get my fabric.

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I bought a few flannel prints ⬆⬆⬆ for the front of the bears, and combined those with some Sesame Street fabric I already had and another flannel solid that was gifted to me.

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These ⬆⬆⬆ are the fabrics for the backs of the bears. There is a combination of minky, fleece, and plush fleece (the green).

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I probably started these in March and have just now finished 3. My goal is 12, but we’ll see 😄

These bears are fairly easy to do. And for anyone interested in making these, here are a few tips:

  • Minky is hard to work with because it likes to slide, but once it’s matched up correctly I found it easy to sew.
  • Using a peice of felt for the nose as the directions reccomend is the way to go.
  • You will use a lot of black embroidery thread. Buy lots.
  • 1 bag of stuffing will get you far. I’ve used enough for 3 bears and it looks like I’ve used hardly any.
  • Minky and plush fleece will shed everywhere, which you will probably notice when it is cut at the store. I found it helpful to use an old sheet spread under the fabric when I cut it and then cleaned up the mess with a lint roller.

 

I think I will get better at these bears as I go along but just wanted to share my progress for those interested.


 

Price breakdown:

Fabric– $15.61, for a 1/2 yard of 6 different fabrics (1.99-3.92 each).

Stuffing-$3.47, and more than likely way more than I need.

Blue thread-$1.45 (I always buy Gutterman).

Total: $20.53

It is very doable to make 10 or more bears for under $25, that’s in the ballpark of $2.50 or less per bear.


 

If you want to get started making these, you can find information and directions here:

https://www.carrythefuture.org/announcements/dolls-hope/

Does this look like something you are intersted in? Have you ever participated in a project like this? Let me know 😄😄

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Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Large Envelope Style Pillow Covers

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A week or so ago I decided it was finally time.

I needed to make new pillow covers for the livingroom pillows. Like yesterday. We had bought a new couch a year or two ago and it came with matching pillows. I didn’t like them but I also didn’t take the initiative to change them.

So a friend and I went to Wal-Mart and I bought some fabric to match with a large scrap I already had. I ended up blindly picking out a blue Waverly Inspirations print that I loved and it matched beautifully.

To make the pillows, I…

  • Planned the project.
  • Calculated the measurements of all the pieces.
  • Cut the pieces.
  • Sewed.
  • Ironed.
  • Then sewed some more.

Plan

I wanted to make 2 envalope pillow cases for the two large couch pillows. They needed to be easy to get on and off but not easy for the kids to remove.

I had fabric for the front and back and also large fabric pieces to line the inside to make them extra sturdy.

Measurements

Front

Ok. So the pillows were 21″ square. From that I knew that the front pieces would be 22×22″ for a 1/2″ seam allowance.

I cut 2 pieces of the chai print fabric and 2 peices for the lining.

Back

Then I had the pieces for the back which I am not 100% on the size, since I needed 2 pieces, factoring in seam allowance, overlap on the back and the hem on the one open side.

I cut 8 pieces total of this size. 4 from the blue waverly script fabric and 4 from my large piece of scrap fabric.

Cutting the Fabric

To cut out large patterns like this I use a very red neck method. (But it works well!) I get out leftover Christmas wrapping paper, measure and draw my pattern, then cut.

I lay the pattern over top the fabric and draw a straight line, then cut it out.

This method works really well with the wrapping paper that has the grid on the back to help you.

Sewing

Pinning and sewing is the fun part. I pinned the fabric pieces with their linings, wrong sides together and sewed all the way around with all 6 pieces.

Then I did the hem on the back pieces, (ironing first) where the edge envelope opening would be.

Then I put wrong sides together and sewed front pieces to the back pieces, taking care to triple stitch the parts where the edge of the back flap was. Then I turned it rightside out and stuffed in the pillows. I loooove the way they look.

And that’s that!

In the end this was what I had:

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Cost:

It cost me about $10.40 to make these two pillow cases, or $5.20 per pillow case. That’s because the lining fabric I used was gifted to me from a friend. So I really only paid for roughly 2 yards, since the chai print I purchased as a scrap.

If I did buy that fabric, it would have added about $6 to the cost of the project.

Have you made any interesting home decor projects lately? Or have any plans to do one?

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Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Kitchen Cupboard Closures {using fabric scraps & buckles}

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Hi guys and welcome to Whipstitch Wednesday 😊 True, just like last time I’m posting on Thursday. But oh well. Maybe I’ll just do it that way from now on.

Anyways. So today I finished up my latest kitchen project, which was making buckle closures for my kitchen cabinets. I had sewn one for one set of cabinets but still needed to sew another.

The deal with kitchen cabinets is that young children need to be kept out of them because of various cleaning chemicals and such. But. The way in which these cabinets are sealed off from the kids needs to be kid-proof, yet easy for the adult to open.

In the past, we’ve been frustrated with the methods we’ve used so I brainstormed and decided on a buckle attached to a fabric strap.

So I made one and it’s worked marvelously. My youngest (nearly 2) cannot unbuckle the strap (so far), and it’s easy for my husband and I to undo. I don’t think my 4-year-old can do buckles yet either, now that I think of it.

So here is a tutorial of how I made these kitchen cupboard closures.


 

Kitchen Cupboard Closures

Difficulty: Easy (-ish)

Materials: Fabric scrap, matching thread, sewing machine (or sewing needle), pins, clothes iron, plastic buckle.

 

Instructions:

 

1. Cut out the fabric.

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The dimensions of your fabric scrap will depend on the measurement around the handles of your kitchen cabinets. After you measure, add about 4 inches, plus 1 inch for turning down the ends.

So for example: 10″+4″+1″=15″.

This is the length.

The width will be 2.5-3″, fitting the slots in the buckle when ironed and doubled over.

 

2. Iron your fabric.

 

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Place fabric right side down. Turn down fabric about 1/2″ on one long side. Iron down and repeat with other side.

Pin fabric, wrong sides together and slip into the buckle to ensure it fits. Un-pin and iron.

Then lastly, iron the short width ends, about 1/2″.

 

3. Sew it.

 

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Sew the fabric on the long side that has the opening, about an 1/8″ from the edge. Repeat with other long side.

Turn short width end over and sew. Repeat with the other short end.

 

3. Buckle time.

 

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Insert one buckle onto the finished strap. Sew as far away from the buckle as possible.

Check your measurements by sliding the strap through the kitchen cabinet handles. Pin the other buckle so that the strap will be tight but not too tight when buckled.

Now sew the other half of the buckle onto the strap.

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All done! Good job 😄😄😄 Now you have a homemade kitchen cabinet closure that looks great and keeps out the little kiddos (we hope!)

If you do try this out, let me know if it works for you. Thanks! 😎

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Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Learning to Knit {winter goals}

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I originally planned to post this yesterday, on Wednesday but a number of factors had a hand in the delay. Hope you enjoy it all the same! 😊

My Brief Absence & A Blogging Update

Hello everyone 🙂 First let me say sorry for my absence here on the blog and WordPress in general. I’m behind reading your posts and behind on my blogging schedule as well.

And it’s all because we got totally sick. It was so immensely not fun. The flu is no joke. I hope none of you get it but if you do you have my complete sympathy.

But anyways. Back to blogging stuff.

 

First of all, I wanted to say…

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A big thank-you to all of my readers because I made it to 100 followers 😊😊😊 Yay! Thanks so much you guys. You inspire me with your likes, your comments, your encouragement here on the blog (and some of you in real-life have been blog-encouragers as well). Many thanks. And here’s to more posts in the days ahead!

 

Introducing Whipstitch Wednesday

Today I’d like to introduce a new category I’m calling Whipstitch Wednesday.

I’ve been doing a ton of different sewing/stitchery projects and thought this would be a fun way to share things I’m doing, learning and any other helpful tips I’ve found.

One thing I’ve been doing lately is (trying) to learn to knit. It’s been a long-time goal of mine.

 

Found a New Hobby at the Hobby Lobby…

So a few weeks ago I went out with a friend to Hobby Lobby and bought some knitting needles. Then I got out some yarn (I’ve been using it for non-knitting projects) and attempted to started to knit. I consulted a ton of books btw, didn’t just pull this out of my brain of course.

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After awhile, I got the knit stitch down. Although it looked too loose and I couldn’t figure out why…then just recently I learned that the big needles go with the big (thick) yarn. This was part of the reason I was so frusterated with my knitting.

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Sweet Success

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I’m so happy 👏👏😄😄 It was hard to get the hang of it but I’m proud of my efforts.

The yarn I used is Red Heart Super Saver in Monet. I think it would be classified as a “worsted” yarn. So better suited for size 6 needles, from what I’ve read, instead of my size 13 needles.

I happened upon a yarn site (loveknitting.com) that was having a sale soooo….yeah I’m hooked. Planning tons of projects. As if I need any more sewing projects haha. Oh well can never have too many. It’s great therapy and perfect for these icky winter days.

Have you been doing any winter sewing projects to de-stress? Do you knit or want to learn someday?

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P.s.- I found these two videos helpful for learning how to purl.

~*~

How To Do a Purl Stitch Knitting, by Howcast

 

~*~

How to Purl – p Stitch Beginner, by GoodKnitKisses

Sewing & Repurposing

Repurposing Receiving Blankets to Make a Toddler Quilt {for Under $35}

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Ever wanted to make a baby or toddler quilt but don’t know quite where to start? How about with something you probably already have…

I made my first-ever quilt last month. First. ever. And guess what? It cost me less than $35 to make. 

But the best part is that this toddler quilt is not only a sewing project but a repurposing one as well.

I looked at a huge stack of flannel receiving blankets awhile ago and wondered what on earth to do with them. I thought about throwing them out…using them as rags. But no. They still had some use. A lot of them were cute prints.

Then I thought…

Quilt.

Yes I will make my daughter a toddler quilt. She will be transitioning to a toddler bed soon and a new quilt will be nice to have.

I wanted to share the process I went through to make this quilt. So the following post will be largely composed of pictures for your viewing pleasure.

So here you go. 2 ½ months of work squeezed into just a few minutes! Enjoy fellow sewers, crafters, repurposing junkies and lovers of art!

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To begin, I cut out 300 little 4″ squares and laid them out in a design. The quilt will be 20 squares long and 15 squares wide.

 

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Then I stacked up the rows and labeled each row.

 

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They were pinned, 2 at a time.

 

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Then those groups of 2’s were sewn together till each row of 20 was sewn. This part was pretty time consuming.

 

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Now I’m ready to start sewing rows together.

 

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I started with row 1 and 2 and pinned right sides together.

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Yeah woot look at that!

 

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Except the backside was totally messed up. And I only realized about halfway through sewing ALL of the rows. Time to re-do 😦

 

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Now 2 rows have been sewn together for rows 1-20.

 

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Then those rows of 2 were sewn together, giving me rows of 4. At this point, the quilt top is in 5 peices.

 

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One more seam will complete the quilt top, joining the 2 peices.

 

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Sewing the last seam!

 

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Completed quilt top.

 

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The back.

 

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At this point I got out my flannel backing and the pieces of the old quilt I had cut apart and assembled the quilt.

 

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Then I took out the quilt top and ironed the back peices down flat.

 

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About to cut the inner layers to size right against the quilt top. (Notice my cat in the bottom right hand corner. Cats love it when you lay a quilt on the floor.)

 

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Complete!

 

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Then one of the most nerve-wrecking parts, cutting the flannel piece to the proper size and pinning. I had to cut, fold, pin and then re-do to get it right.

 

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Notice my daughter trying to pick out the pins. She did that the whoooolllee time!

 

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Finally. Here I am sewing the last side of the quilt.

 

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The last step was tying the ties. About 150 of them, which took longer than I anticipated. And yep the quilt has been well loved and thus the wrinkles.

 

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Back of the quilt. The ties go through all layers of the quilt and hold everything together. It also makes for a more “flexible” blanket.

 

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I love the swirling pattern.

 

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Close-up of the nursery print with a tie.

 

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Love this print.

 

It was a relief to finally finish this project just a few days before Christmas. I made a few flukes but I don’t really care. The proof is in the pudding, as they say and I think I have a good one.


 

Price breakdown

 

Thread

4 spools beige thread @ $2.90 each= $11.60

2 embroidery floss (60¢ each)=$1.20

Fabric (all new)

-Flannel fabric, for backing, 53″ wide× 64 ½” long= $12.90

(This was from a 110″×54″ peice, or 1 ½ yards.)

-Nursery print flannel fabric, 1 yd= $7.50

Free stuff

-Roughly 8yds (1 yd each color/pattern) of flannel solids & prints.

-inner layer of the quilt from 2 layers of an old quilt.

 

Total cost= $33.20


 

God Bless & stay warm! It’s a cold one out there for sure…it’s been 20 or below here in the midwest for for-ev-er. (So it seems. Probably 10 days at most.) I can not wait for it to warm up!

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***Measurements: This finished quilt measures 49″ wide × 60 ½” long