Uncategorized

So When Will I Get Better? {a new way to look at recovery- from the blog 1000 Ways To Be Fearless}

sunset-3087790

Have you ever had someone ask you, “So, are you better now?” It’s a well-meaning question, but it is one that is sadly a misinterpretation of just how mental illness works.

But in all fairness, I have asked myself the same question.

“When will I get better?”

It isn’t an easy question to ask, because I already know the answer.

“People tend to think that recovery is one upward trajectory. You go through a bad time, you get better, then you’re back to your normal self. Unfortunately, the complexity of human emotion and experience doesn’t quite fit into such a pattern.”

-Ruth, 1000 Ways To Be Fearless

from: A Talk: Recovery Isn’t Linear-A New Way of Viewing Recovery from a Mental Illness.

But what I’ve come to see…is that I’m not a failure for struggling with mental illness. It doesn’t make me a bad person. It doesn’t mean that day is shot. Worthless. Over.

No.

Recovery from a mental illness is not carefully constructed. It can’t be controlled or planned.

person-731187

It just is. It might be a bit messy, but that’s life, and life is messy

I want to invite you to check out this post from Ruth, of the blog 1000 Ways To Be Fearless. Her blog has been a wonderful tool in my own journey towards recovery. 

In her post she shares a speech she made at an event for the NHS (National Health Service in England). I thought what she had to say about recovery was beautiful, relatable and so, so true.

I really enjoyed this post of hers and I think that you will too ☺

A Talk: Recovery Isn’t Linear-A New Way of Viewing Recovery From a Mental Illness

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Blog Updates, Uncategorized

Blogiversary Reminisce {blog update #4}

marcelo-matarazzo-389106-unsplash

Hello to my lovely readers,

I’m rolling 3 thoughts into one, as this post is an anniversary, thank-you and a reflection on one year of blogging 😄

Today, this day, one year ago is when I started blogging…blogging for real.

I started in 2014 but didn’t have the gumption to blog regurally. It was 1x a month at the time, if that.

May 17th, 2017 I decided to make my first post: Pregnancy, Parenting and God’s Grace. It was about my long (16-month) absence on the blog and what motherhood is like with a baby and a toddler…and how God’s plans aren’t always my plans, but they turn out to be the BEST plans anyways 😉

I was unsure of where this blog would take me. I was nervous that people wouldn’t like what I had to say. That people would never like my posts or think that my blog was worth reading.

But I was wrong. People did want to hear. People did care. You, my fellow bloggers, were kind. You cared. I was a newbie and you took the time to read my stuff.

PicsArt_05-17-01.18.12

So thank-you to all of you. To my readers on and off WordPress. I’m honored. I’m blessed. Thank-you for following my blog. Thank-you for taking the time to read. It means so much to me 🌞❤

I’ve been going through my blog stats, looking at my most-loved posts. Seeing what you guys like so I can improve the blog.

In my reminesce, here are the top 5 posts that you guys loved most on The Buttercup Lamb.

 

Top 5 Posts

1. When Grace Doesn’t Seem Like Enough {5 things to remember}

2. The pain in the quiet, healing flow

3. 5 Favorite Things {on our FL vacation}

4. Nourishing Lentil Stew with Daikon and Sweet Potato

5. Crockpot Calico Beans

Going through these helped me realize what kind of content interests people, which turned out to be the posts that I most enjoyed writing 😯😝

hands-2458396

It’s another year. Of learning, growing and writing. I’ve written 100+ posts and have been slowly gaining followers (but pushing closer to the big 200!)

I’ll be brainstorming new ideas for posts, new designs and new ways to mesh my visions and goals with the stuff I love writing about.

Thanks again everyone!

What kinds of topics would you like to see on the blog? Do you enjoy the recipes and food? The poems? Reflections posts? Or maybe something else? Let me know in the comments, it would be such a big help to me 😊

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Reflections

Struggling Against Anxiety {part 2 in a series of poems}

PicsArt_05-12-07.10.09

As I said in my last post, May is Mental Health Awareness month. And it seemed like the perfect time to talk about some important topics.

Stemming from the subject of mental health is a variety of topics. Mental health can be everyday stuff. It can be things like phobias, or illnesses like OCD, depression, panic disorder, anxiety. The list goes on.

And I just want to say…I am not a mental health expert. I only know what I’ve experienced. This series of poems on mental illness are meant to bring awareness and share what these things really feel like.

PicsArt_05-12-08.20.15

It’s hard. It’s hard to live with. It’s hard to share. And if you or someone close to you struggles with mental illness, then you know exactly what I mean and where I am coming from.

Today’s poem is about anxiety and panic attacks. The very words “panic attack” steal fear into the hearts of people. They don’t know what to say about it. They are…unsure. Uncomfortable.

And it’s ok.

It’s ok. But for the people that don’t know, and maybe want to know…and yet don’t, I wrote this poem. It is a description of a small piece of my world when anxiety comes in and erases much of what I know.

 

girl-2193272

Invisibly Visible

 

I’m invisibly visible

You see me

And now you don’t.

 

You see me

And I’m fine

But you can’t feel

My heart

 

My pulse.

My mind.

 

You see

And yet you don’t.

 

Fear makes fear

Afraid

 

And so you turn

Away.

 

Afraid it is contagious.

Afraid you’ll catch my pain.

 

And though I crave

Your understanding

 

I hope you never know

This invisible

Disease.

brotherhood-2173097

Important Note: If you or someone you love is dealing with intense anxiety and/or panic attacks, it is important to remember these 2 things: 1) you are not alone and 2) there is help for you. You can call the suicide hotline: 1-800-273-8255. You can call your doctor and get on a prescription, you can call your mom, your spouse, your bestie. You can dig down deep and find therapies and healthy ways to cope. There is help, I promise. And it will, it will, it will get better

For more on how I cope with anxiety, see my post Bravery in Motion: 10 Ways to Help Overcome a Panic Attack

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

All photos are from pixabay. The poem is my own.

Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Making Bears for Carry the Future

PicsArt_05-10-03.56.12

Today I finally, finally got to finishing some stuffed bears I had been planning on making for Carry the Future.

Last August, I was nominated for the Liebster award by Sharon, of the blog Leadership2Mommyship. In my post One Lovely Blog Award & Leibster Award I shared that I was totally in love with an organization called Carry the Future that gives aide and baby carriers to refugees, especially those in the Middle East.

They had a great need for certain items, and while I have slightly limited resources, I do like to sew. I saw that Carry the Future was partnering with Dolls of Hope, which made simple doll and bear patterns available for anyone interested.

(I decided on the bear pattern because it looked easier.)

Not too long ago, I actually downloaded the pattern, planned the project and then went to Wal-Mart to get my fabric.

PicsArt_05-10-04.24.19

I bought a few flannel prints ⬆⬆⬆ for the front of the bears, and combined those with some Sesame Street fabric I already had and another flannel solid that was gifted to me.

PicsArt_05-10-04.23.21

These ⬆⬆⬆ are the fabrics for the backs of the bears. There is a combination of minky, fleece, and plush fleece (the green).

PicsArt_05-10-04.26.14

PicsArt_05-10-04.22.38

I probably started these in March and have just now finished 3. My goal is 12, but we’ll see 😄

These bears are fairly easy to do. And for anyone interested in making these, here are a few tips:

  • Minky is hard to work with because it likes to slide, but once it’s matched up correctly I found it easy to sew.
  • Using a peice of felt for the nose as the directions reccomend is the way to go.
  • You will use a lot of black embroidery thread. Buy lots.
  • I bag of stuffing will get you far. I’ve used enough for 3 bears and it looks like I’ve used hardly any.
  • Minky and plush fleece will shed everywhere, which you will probably notice when it is cut at the store. I found it helpful to use an old sheet spread under the fabric when I cut it and then cleaned up the mess with a lint roller.

 

I think I will get better at these bears as I go along but just wanted to share my progress for those interested.


 

Price breakdown:

Fabric– $15.61, for a 1/2 yard of 6 different fabrics (1.99-3.92 each).

Stuffing-$3.47, and more than likely way more than I need.

Blue thread-$1.45 (I always buy Gutterman).

Total: $20.53

It is very doable to make 10 or more bears for under $25, that’s in the ballpark of $2.50 or less per bear.


 

If you want to get started making these, you can find information and directions here:

https://www.carrythefuture.org/announcements/dolls-hope/

Does this look like something you are intersted in? Have you ever participated in a project like this? Let me know 😄😄

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Reflections

The Debilitating Nature of Depression {part 1 in a series of poems}

PicsArt_05-05-01.13.18

Today I would like to open up and talk a little about a topic I don’t normally discuss here on the blog.

Mental illness.

PicsArt_05-05-11.23.28

Because May is Mental Health Awareness month, I wanted to devote a few posts to the topic.

So many people have had good things to say and share about the topic. Here on WordPress, Facebook and other places on the world wide web.

I admire their courage. I admire their strength.

It takes courage to live with mental illness, but just about as much to share that you struggle with it.

wooden-track-1932611

 

Today I would like to shed some light on the mental illness that is depression.

More specifically, I have sought to describe how depression can both make a person feel like time is standing still and yet going on forever. You can feel stuck. In life, in your day, in a moment.

If you are one of the many who struggle with depression, I hope that this poem can be an encouragement to you and a gentle reminder to get back to the you that you know.

Depression is a real struggle. There is hope. You are not alone.

love-3365338

 

You Can’t Stay In Forever

You can’t stay in forever

If ever,

You know.

You can’t fight the pace

That’s slowing

You down.

Forever

Is never

a’ changin’.

And change

Oh change

Is

Good.

I crave forever

When I’m feeling

Down.

But forever

Is heavy.

Forever’s a trap.

Don’t let

“I’m never changing ever”

Spin you out of

Control.

 

Bring you back.

 

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

This poem is my own.

All pictures are from pixabay. Photo 1 and 2 are my design.

foraging, The Great Outdoors

More Spring Foraging Fun: Dandelion, Violet and Skunk Cabbage

PicsArt_05-01-01.12.56

 

Dandelions

There are a ton of things that can be done with this common “weed”. You can use all parts of this plant. Blossoms, leaves, roots.

I’ve blogged about my experiences with roasted dandelion root tea. And as I’ve been expanding my garden this year, I’ve saved all the roots I’ve found for tea making.

I’ve also added some greens to my salads. They are best (I feel) when they are very tiny. Otherwise they are a bit too bitter for my liking.

PicsArt_05-01-02.31.55

This time of year, I’m concentrating more on the blossoms. A few days ago I (with help) picked a ton of flowers. Why so many, you ask?

Here’s a few reasons:

  1. Dandelion wine
  2. Dandelion salve
  3. Dandelion bath blend
  4. Baked goods with dandelion
  5. Dandelion jelly

I (again, with help!) picked the petals from enough flowers to get 3 quarts needed for wine-making. Then I filled up my dehydrator and dried as much of the rest as I could. (5 hours @ 135ºF.)

I picked the petals from those flowers and stored them away for later use in salve and bath blends.

 

Violets

Aside from their obvious beauty, here’s another reason, nutrition-wise, why violets are so awesome….

According to Euell Gibbons in his book Stalking the Healthful Herbs, just one half-cup of violet blossoms have as much vitamin C as 4 oranges!

PicsArt_05-01-02.28.19

I haven’t done a lot with violets thus far aside from eat them in salads. But I would like to try to make a violet syrup, as well as dry some for bath blends and tea.

 

Skunk Cabbage

For the record, I did not eat any. Just want to get that out there haha.

Story time. There is a creek bed not far from my home that has these absolutely gigantic plants that fill the area, beginning in early spring.

I have been dying to know what they were. I knew they looked like cabbage. I asked everybody. I asked google. I asked my grandma. Could not find out…what it was.

PicsArt_05-01-02.38.21

And then I read a very entertaining chapter (again from Stalking the Healthful Herbs, by Euell Gibbons) all about skunk cabbage.

I smelled a fresh cut leaf. It did have a bit of an odor, but not as intense as I thought. It did smell a bit like actual cabbage and a bit skunky. My husband agreed with the verdict.

How about you? Have you seen any interesting looking plants about?

Happy Spring everyone!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Motherhood, Reflections

When Grace Doesn’t Seem Like Enough {5 things to remember}

PicsArt_04-18-11.33.51

 

What is it about motherhood that keeps me coming back to the issue of grace? 

What is it about this stage of life that has us holding on to it? Whispering about it? Pleading for it?

I think the reason is…

Because motherhood is a time of great vulnerability. It can be a time of great struggle. Of growth, yes. But also a time of many, many demands that can leave us breathless.

And we (or at least I do) get into this place where we think, “I should be doing everything. And I should be doing everything right.”

Sounds silly when it’s written down, eh? But it’s there. That grapple for grace.

To understand it. 

To open your arms to it.

To breathe it in and let God’s grace settle around you.

And I’ve found that I need it most when I want it least.

The definition of grace, according to dictionary.com is…

  • the freely given, unmerited favor and love of God.

  • the influence, or spirit of God operating in humans to regenerate or strengthen them.

Something will happen, an instance, be it great or small. And you’ll think, “I can’t receive any grace. I’m not deserving!”

And that, my friend is when you need to dig deeply into The Word, and see what God says about it and who He is. And realize just what this grace means for you.

Follow me on this journey through scripture as I’ve learned about this marvel that is God’s sweet grace. 


 

5 Things to Remember When God’s Grace Doesn’t Seem Like Enough

 

hub-1985520

1. I am unique.

 

1 Peter 4:10

“Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in it’s various forms.” (NIV)

 

You, my friend, are a uniquely created woman of God. He loves you. He’s given you talents, abilities and gifts that make you, you.

It’s like the veggie tales slogan, “God made you special, and He loves you very much!” It’s so so true!

By God’s grace, we are entrusted with spiritual gifts. And I would argue that since He made us, He has given us gifts, talents and interests that make us so wonderfully unique.

 

2. I am free to give as I have been given.

 

Matthew 10:8b

“Freely you have received, freely give.” (NIV)

 

But it’s not always easy to freely give, is it? Not always. Sometimes I’d rather just freely not give. Freely do what I want on my own terms. But oh…that minset will not bring freedom or peace.

As freely as God has given to me, I should give back, serving others and thus serving Him. Glory to God!

 

bottle-3061889

3. I am a new person, alive and breathing in Christ.

 

Ephesians 2:4

God is merciful! We were dead because of our sins, but God loved us so much that He made us alive with Christ, and God’s wonderful kindness is what saves you. (CEV)

 

There is so much power in this verse. God, through his perfect and beautiful kindness, has made us whole. He made us His own. We are His special treasure. (Deuteronomy 7:6).

 

4. I can trust Him.

 

Galatians 2:20

“My old self has been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me. So I live in this earthly body by trusting in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.” (NLT)

 

My old self is no more. Some days I struggle to remember! Christ has made His home within my heart. I must trust Him. Trust that He knows what He’s doing. He knows the way and He is a faithful guide.

And when it’s hard to trust? Ask Him to help you learn to trust Him more. 😊

 

beautiful-3062365

5. I can rest in His deep love.

 

Hosea 3:19-20

“I will betroth you to me forever; I will betroth you in righteousness and justice, in love and compassion. I will betroth you in faithfulness, and you will acknowledge the LORD.” (NIV)

 

Something about this verse strikes my heart deeply. I’m currently in a study on Hosea and I have learned way more about God’s deep and tender love reading this book of the Bible than I ever thought possible.

Just like Isreal in the book of Hosea, I mess up. I stray. I glory in my security and forget God.

Sometimes I get lazy. And I neglect to do things. Like mop my kitchen floor. Which, believe it or not, is what inspired this post. Simple as it was, I could not accept that God had given me grace…for neglecting my housekeeping of all things. Why couldn’t I just accept His grace?

I realised I needed to dig deeply into who God is. (For my Hosea friends…I realized I needed to yada God. 😉 For others who may not know, yada=to intimately know.)

He is righteous, just, loving, compassionate.

Never ever ever will he forget us or abandon us.

20180417_171101_0001

His love for us is a strength we can never fathom. A love we can never outgrow. A love that will not run out based on the things we do.

He is faithful.

He is gracious.

And He will restore.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

All photos are from pixabay.

Beverages, Food

Chickweed and Cantaloupe Smoothie {with banana, strawberry and oats}

PicsArt_04-13-09.52.01

So. *glances at clock* It is rather late on this Friday night but a promise is a promise. I said that I’d share my chickweed smoothie recipe today.

And so never fear, my loyal readers. I shall share it! *cue superhero music* To the blender!

(This recipe was alluded to in my last post: Two Ways to Eat Chickweed {spring foraging fun}.)

If you didn’t read the post, here is a quick summary⤵⤵⤵

PicsArt_04-12-03.47.04

This⬆⬆⬆  and this ⤵⤵⤵ is chickweed.

PicsArt_04-12-03.53.56

  • It grows in your yard.
  • It is an edible weed.
  • Birds/chicks like to eat it, hence the name.
  • It is full of vitamin C.
  • It tastes a little like spinach, but on the bland side.

Perfect for smoothies. And so I came up with the………..

PicsArt_04-11-05.38.27


 

Chickweed and Cantaloupe Smoothie

Servings: 1-2

Cook/prep time: 10 minutes or less

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole frozen banana, diced
  • 4 frozen strawberries, diced
  • 3 smallish cubes cantaloupe
  • a handful of well rinsed chickweed, torn into a few pieces
  • a handful of *quick oats
  • about 1/2 TBS cocoa powder
  • 1-2 cups (240-480mL) unsweetened vanilla almond milk

*gluten-free oats will make this recipe gluten and dairy-free.

Directions:

  1. Put all ingredients into a blender from first to last. (Fruit first, almond milk last.) I poured in almond milk until it reached the 2 cup line.
  2. Give it a quick stir.
  3. Blend on high until you reach your desired texture.

Cost:

I calculated that this smoothie cost me no more than $1.40. And that is probably overestimating. That’s about 70¢ per 8oz/240mL serving. Pretty good deal, eh?

Enjoy your smoothie! Let me know if you try it with the chickweed. It’s totally worth looking ridiculous for as your neighbors stare at you ripping it out of your yard. Haha! Promise! 😝😉

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

foraging, The Great Outdoors

Two Ways to Eat Chickweed {spring foraging fun}

PicsArt_04-11-06.07.33

It was about 2 weeks ago and I decided it was time. After a long, dreary winter that never seemed to want to stop…it was time to commence spring foraging.

I’ve been watching, waiting…observing the subtle signs that spring whispers to those who choose to listen.

Robins. Little green sprouting things poking through the earth.

Buds forming on the trees in my backyard.

Geese flying through the sky.

The sweet spring sun has come. Easter has passed and brought joy in so many different ways.

I’ve always seen Easter as the tipping point for the winter season. February is that first ray of hope and then it’s Easter and I think, “Almost. We’re almost there. Full blown spring is quite close”.

And it’s a time of celebration and joy and thanks for newness of life. All of nature brought together to celebrate the victory of life over death.

Ah me. I’m turning reflective. When this post is to be about foraging. Haha. Continuing.

One of the earliest plants to grow and really thrive in my backyard is chickweed. I’ve recently learned to really love the stuff.

PicsArt_04-12-03.47.04

Until recently, I’ve really only looked at chickweed as a flat spreading weed with tiny leaves and pretty little white flowers. I never considered the benefits of chowing down on it.

PicsArt_04-12-03.53.56

I’ve purchased a few foraging books over the winter. They are:

  • Stalking the Healthful Herbs, by Euell Gibbons
  • Midwest Foraging: 115 Wild and Flavorful Edibles from Burdock to Wild Peach, by Lisa M. Rose.

From those books I learned a myriad of things about the plant in question but mainly:

  1. It is called chickweed because baby chickens/small birds love to eat it.
  2. It has a ton of vitamin C.

It’s easy to find. It’s free. And super-healthy. It has a bland spinach-like taste, but not quite as strong.

Ok great. But how to eat it? Glad you asked 😊 Lately I’ve had 2 ways I love to fix chickweed.

PicsArt_04-11-05.45.57

First off, salad. Here I combined beet greens, a bit of chickweed and some baby dandelion greens. Then I topped it off with some cucumber and radish slices.

It was pretty good and a nice way to get a mixed greens salad without buying a big container of expensive organic salad that I can never seem to finish.

PicsArt_04-11-05.31.09

Next I decided to use a handful of chickweed as the greens in my smoothie. It accompanied frozen bananas, strawberries, quick oats, cocoa powder and almond milk.

And I threw in a few pieces of cantaloupe because I wanted something different.

PicsArt_04-11-05.38.27

And it was! But in a good way. 😊😊 I loved adding in super fresh greens in place of my usual spinach leaves.

**I will post the recipe tomorrow for you guys. 😊🍓🍌🌱

Thus concludes my adventures with chickweed…for now…..

Do you enjoy foraging for spring plants? Any particular plants or recipes you wish to try?

Let me know, I’d love to hear about it. Everyone’s foraging experience is unique and I love learning from others. 😄😄

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Food, Lunch/Simple Meal

Nourishing Lentil Stew with Daikon and Sweet Potato

PicsArt_04-04-03.31.18

Today for the second time in 3 days, the weather has chosen to deviate from acceptable “spring” conditions to an unacceptable wintry mix of horror.

It has been snowing.

Monday-snow.

Tuesday-rain (and lots of it) ☔ ☔ ☔

Wednesday-snow. Coupled windy-like blustery weather reminiscent of a hurricane.

What??

Quit it winter. Goooo away. Seriously.

 

So I decided that if the weather is going to be wacky and un-spring-like, I was going to make a dish of food that was reflective of that.

I made a lentil stew using a bunch of veggies, some of them spring veggies.

Take that, winter weather.

PicsArt_04-04-03.43.18

I began by thawing and heating some chicken bone broth in my dutch oven. Then I cooked up some lentils.

PicsArt_04-04-03.46.12

Next was more chicken broth and a plethora of vegetables. Onion, carrots, daikon, red radishes, beet and sweet potato. The only seasoning I used was thyme and salt. Keepin’ it simple is my jam 😝😎😋

I just added what I had and went a little bit out of my comfort zone with the flavor. But it turned out well.

For this recipe, I cut the carrots, sweet potato, and beet into smaller pieces so they would cook faster. The onions, daikon and radishes will not need as long to cook, so you could add them in last if you want a chunkier stew.

And don’t feel like you have to use any veggies you don’t like or have. Make it fun, make it you. 😋

PicsArt_04-04-04.04.39


 

Nourishing Lentil Stew with Daikon and Sweet Potato

Serves: 4-6

Cook time: about 45 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 7 cups/46oz/1,680mL homemade chicken bone broth, divided.*
  • 3/4 cup/113g lentils
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
  • 1 small piece daikon, peeled and thinly sliced.
  • 2 red radishes, thinly sliced.
  • a few slices of fresh beet, sliced.
  • 1/4 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon salt

*I used a combination of chicken bone broth (4 cups/960mL) and chicken soup base+water (3 cups/720mL, I used Gia Russa brand).

 

Directions:

  1. In a large pot, add lentils to 4 cups/960mL of the chicken broth. Bring to a boil, then simmer, covered for 20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, prep the veggies. When the lentils are done, add in the 3 cups/720mL remaining chicken broth, veggies and seasonings.
  3. Cook on medium high heat, uncovered, until carrots, sweet potatoes and beets are done.

 

Cost:

I estimated that it cost me about $2.05 to make this pot of stew. That’s 51¢ per 4 (large) servings. If you divide it into 6 servings, that’s 34¢ per serving.

Cheap, filling, delicious and nutritious.

Enjoy!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

 

 

Natural Skin Care

Favorite Spring Lip Balms {review and rank by $}

PicsArt_03-29-11.01.44

Spring+lip balm.

I had so much fun with my last lip balm post that I decided to do another. So here we are😃

(If you fancy checking it out, that post is here: My Top 5 Favorite Lip Balms {stocking stuffer ideas}

Two things (before I get to the lipbalms)

1. I like natural stuff. (If you follow along, I’m sure you couldn’t tell 😛😛) So many of my choices here are…

  • all-natural
  • or organic
  • vegan
  • made with free-trade ingredients
  • all of the above, etc.

I like my beauty products crunchy. Not always. But usually. I’m not vegan, but I do appreciate vegan products. And I very much love being earth and people conscious.

Products made with recycled materials. Ingredients that come from companies who give fair wages and don’t exploit poorer workers and resources in other countries. All that good stuff.

I like buying products that go for a good cause. I can’t always afford to. But…I like to.

PicsArt_03-27-04.17.53

2. I’m going to start rating the lip balms I review. The scale will look like this:

Good 💜

Better 💜💜

Very nice 💜💜💜

Really (really) nice 💜💜💜💜

Factors will include flavor, texture, smell, and effectiveness of the product.

 

The Lip Balm Lineup

 

PicsArt_03-29-10.52.57

Smooth Sphere Lip Balm in Blueberry Acai, by EOS

Flavor-nice sweet taste.

Texture-good balance of oil & wax.

Smell-not keen on the smell. I think it smells like a blueberry muffin. Can’t make out the acai very well.

Effectiveness-I feel like I have to keep re-applying, maybe because the sweet taste makes me want to lick my lips.

Other things I love: I love the shape and colors of the eos lip balms. Additionally, my daughter (age 2) really loves this one.

PicsArt_03-30-03.12.49

 

PicsArt_03-29-10.50.46

Mongo Kiss Vanilla Honey Lip Balm, by Eco Lips

Flavor-flavor is ok. Pretty mild.

Texture-Very balanced oil to wax ratio.

Smell-Nice but seems slightly off to me. I think I expected a stronger vanilla smell.

Effectiveness-Wears very well. I especially love to use this lip balm at night.

Other things I love: The ingredients are organic and the company uses fair trade cocoa seed butter.

The ingredients are also non-gmo and cruelty-free.

Also the mongongo oil intrigues me.

PicsArt_03-30-03.05.15

 

PicsArt_03-29-10.48.19

Everyday Coconut Fair Trade Lip Balm in Coconut Mint, by Alaffia

Flavor– Absolutely love. Coconut and mint are subtle but not too subtle. Taste is fresh and clean, but warm.

Texture– Somewhat oily, but waxy enough to protect my lips and wear well.

Smell– Love it.

Effectiveness-Works very well.

Other things I love: It is vegan, has only 5 ingredients and uses fair-trade coconut oil.

PicsArt_03-30-03.07.52

 

PicsArt_03-29-10.46.43

Wildflower Lip Balm (Vanilla and Violet), by GypsyFaeCreations

Flavor– The flavor, to me tasted a tiny bit like grape.

Texture– More oily/buttery.

Smell– Really love. I can totally make out the violet and it is divine.

Effectiveness– I didn’t feel like this balm was super moisturizing, maybe because of the buttery-ness.

Other things I love- This lipbalm is from an etsy shop. The owner, Tierrafae, is very creative and makes mainly soaps. I love supporting small businesses through etsy.

PicsArt_03-30-03.12.49

Pemberley Lip Balm (Rose and Honey), by GypsyFaeCreations

(No picture because in taking a group picture of the lipbalms in water I damaged the label.)

Flavor– The flavor was a bit strong on the rose element.

Texture– A small bit on the waxy side to me.

Smell– Same as above.

Effectiveness– I really wanted to love this lip balm but I found I didn’t enjoy wearing it long enough to really tell how well it worked.

What I loved- I loved the idea and Jane Austen fandom behind this product, which is the main reason I chose to buy it 😊

PicsArt_03-30-03.15.23

 

PicsArt_03-29-10.49.41

Chai Spice Lip Balm, by Hurraw! Balm

Flavor– Love it 100%.

Texture– A bit oily, but still good.

Smell– Love.

Effectiveness– Wears well.

Other things I love- the ingredients are organic, vegan and raw. I love this chai lip balm even better than the one from Primal Pit Paste (Pucker Paste).

PicsArt_03-30-03.05.15

Price comparison: $-$$$

 

Eco Lips (Mongo Kiss)- $1.97, for .25oz

1oz= $7.88


 

Eos$3.49, for .25oz

1oz= $13.96


 

Alaffia (Everyday Coconut)-$2.24, for .15oz

1oz= $14.94


 

GypsyFaeCreations (Wildflower)- $3.00, for .15oz

1oz= $20.01


 

GypsyFaeCreations (Pemberly)$3.00, for .15oz

1oz= $20.01


 

Hurraw! Balm$3.79 for .15oz

1oz= 25.28


 

So from this price comparison you can see that the more product you get for the cheapest price, the better deal you have.

However, it isn’t a deal if you don’t love the product. (Eco lips is an example of a great product for a great price.)

Another good lip balm I mentioned in my previous lip balm post is Smith’s Rosebud Salve. I purchased some when we were on vacation for $5.95. Sounds pricy right? But it’s .8oz, which equates to $7.44/oz…cheaper than even Eco Lips.

Eventually I hope to get into making my own lip balms. Possibly this summer or fall, if certain plants in my garden decide to cooperate. We shall see 😃😃🌱🌱🌈

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Caturday

Stella in the Sunshine

PicsArt_03-24-09.38.00

Ah sweet sunshine. We have had more of it lately. I love to chill out and spend awhile in the afternoons soaking up the sun.

Stella decided it was safe to come out (the kids were distracted playing a game) and she decided that sunbeams are wonderful too.

In fact, she probably knows that better than I do.

PicsArt_03-24-09.39.12

PicsArt_03-24-09.41.00

Cats love sunshine. And somehow, cats and knitting always go together.

I’m knitting another dishcloth here..my 3rd one so far. It’s covered in cat hair by now but of course I’ll wash it first when it’s finished. 😆🐈🐈🐾

Happy Caturday! Tuck into a bit of a sunbeam, if you can find one today😃

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Reflections

Letting Go {amidst the purls and the knits}

coffee-3043424

I must confess…

Letting go has never been easy for me. I hold too tightly, keep myself from change.

But in knitting…

If you hold too tightly, if you don’t let go, then you will never make a stitch. You can’t make any kind of progress at all.

It’s a simple enough concept, but I keep coming back to it. When I started knitting, my kids were sick with the flu. My son got it first. He was so sick. Sick with a high fever every night until Advil calmed it down.

Holding tight to our babies-that’s what mamas do best. I’m not suggesting letting go in any sense. 

But for me, I had to let go of the fear. The worry of, “Will he be ok??”. I wasn’t in charge of his healing. I had to trust that my prayers of petition to God and my limited ministrations would get him through.

And he did. He got over the flu. In spite of my fears and the paranoia fed by constant news updates telling me how horrible the flu is for children. (Thanks NBC.)

PicsArt_03-21-06.27.55

But back to knitting. I know I’ve been talking about knitting a lot. And that’s just because I’ve been doing a lot of it.

On vacation I knit square after square. It’s so grounding and therapeutic and easy to do while riding in the car, visiting with family. As a person who fidgets, knitting is bomb.

When I began learning how to knit, my work was a tangled mess. My stitches were loopy. I couldn’t figure out the direction of the needles. I would get nervous once I had formed thread on the needles, dreading letting go. Dreading the wrong stitch.

Isn’t that just how life is? We don’t want to mess up. So we hold on to things. We hold on and hold on, telling ourselves,”I can’t do that. I don’t want to fail. I don’t have what it takes”. 

But that’s wrong. I’m in the wrong for thinking that. I can’t is powerfully debilitating.

I can’t

It can cripple your life.

Your will.

Your desire to grow.

To be a stronger & better version of you. 

I’m not saying that who you are is not good enough. No, never. 

PicsArt_03-21-06.29.42

What I mean is that you will fulfill whatever prophecy you proclaim for your life.

If it is “I can’t do that“, then you won’t.

If it is “I’m afraid to try“, then it will keep you from new experiences.

I say these things from experience. I say them because I’ve believed “I can’t” about things for far too long. Because I’ve allowed fear instead of a desire to be vulnerable and different and broken to pervade my life. To control me.

I’ve feared letting go.

And I can fear it no more.

It’s time for change.

Bring on spring.

PicsArt_03-21-06.21.48

This poem is my own.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 4, Dessert & Beverage)

PicsArt_03-16-02.43.37

Welcome back my wonderful readers to this Moroccan edition of Global Eats! It’s been a wonderful journey 😄

Here we are at Part 4, the end of my research and recipes on Morocco, and possibly the end of Global Eats for a time.

You can view parts I-III below, if ya care to:

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 1, Intro)

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 2, Condiment)

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 3, Main Dish)

But today, oh today is about….

Dessert! (And tea…but mostly dessert!)

I’m pretty excited for this one. How about you? Today I am sharing pictures from a recipe for Moroccan Coconut and Semolina Cookies, from blog Tajoon.

What I love about this blog is that it is authentic Moroccan food from a Moroccan blogger.

Loubna lives in the states but is from Morocco. One issue I had with this series is that it was difficult to find authentic recipes from Moroccan bloggers. This site has quite a few awesome recipes & I was happy to find it.

Making the Coconut and Semolina Cookies

PicsArt_03-16-03.00.24

Here is the set up for the cookies. I planned to make a 1/2 batch.

I subbed a few ingredients here. I didn’t have much white sugar (I try not to use it too much) so I used part white sugar and part coconut sugar.

Because the coconut flakes I had were on the chunky side, I ground them down a bit with a mortar and pestle to give it a finer texture.

Then lastly, I did not have orange water but I used what rose water I had. That stuff smells so good! 🌹😊

PicsArt_03-16-02.58.23

PicsArt_03-16-02.57.04

A half batch made 12 good-sized cookies.

PicsArt_03-16-02.54.16

PicsArt_03-16-02.52.44

These were messy, oh so messy to make. But fun and pretty easy.

As the cookies cooled, I made a cup of chocolate mint tea and let it steep for a good hour or so.

Then I added some raw honey and poured it into a pretty glass jelly jar.

PicsArt_03-16-02.51.44

What I Love About This Recipe

Several things. First of all…

  • It’s dairy-free.
  • It uses a flour I’ve never worked with before.
  • And you don’t have to chill the dough.

Taste

The taste is unlike anything I’ve ever tasted in a cookie. Like I said, I’ve never used semolina flour. The texture is a bit like fine cornmeal.

Texture

The texture of these cookies is what I would call crunchy. But not crispy. The semolina flour and coconut gave these cookies a good bit of texture. To me they tasted like a crispy waffle.

After letting these cookies sit overnight, I would say that the texture improved. The cookies were less crunchy and softer in texture.

I think this is the same concept as a cake made with oil. The first day it’s a bit dry. So you let it sit and its better the next day.

Taste

Not a whole lot of taste going on. Maybe this is due to the coconut sugar? There is some flavor from the coconut flakes and flour but it’s not like the dramatically flavored and sweetened American cookies I know.

But that’s probably a good thing. More sugar=more cravings=you can’t stop eating them=sugar crash.

These are good cookies and they do go well with the sweetened mint tea. They go well with a hot beverage the same way that biscotti goes well with coffee or whatnot. Although I’ve heard most Italians like their biscotti with wine…

Conclusion

Quick Preserved lemons, Chicken, Apricot and Almond Tagine and Coconut and Semolina Cookies.

Thus ends the Moroccan edition of my Global Eats series. Hope you’ve enjoyed our journey through the beautiful and uniquely delicious country of Morocco.

It’s been far from a complete culinary experience but I’ve had a lot of fun learning about so many unique dishes and flavors. And I’ve enjoyed sharing some of what I’ve learned with you guys. 🙂

It’s been a fun series but I’m looking forward to writing about other things.

I just finished planning my garden today so perhaps that will be one of the upcoming categories.

Thank-you for following along & God bless!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Large Envelope Style Pillow Covers

PicsArt_03-15-01.37.52

A week or so ago I decided it was finally time.

I needed to make new pillow covers for the livingroom pillows. Like yesterday. We had bought a new couch a year or two ago and it came with matching pillows. I didn’t like them but I also didn’t take the initiative to change them.

So a friend and I went to Wal-Mart and I bought some fabric to match with a large scrap I already had. I ended up blindly picking out a blue Waverly Inspirations print that I loved and it matched beautifully.

To make the pillows, I…

  • Planned the project.
  • Calculated the measurements of all the pieces.
  • Cut the pieces.
  • Sewed.
  • Ironed.
  • Then sewed some more.

Plan

I wanted to make 2 envalope pillow cases for the two large couch pillows. They needed to be easy to get on and off but not easy for the kids to remove.

I had fabric for the front and back and also large fabric pieces to line the inside to make them extra sturdy.

Measurements

Front

Ok. So the pillows were 21″ square. From that I knew that the front pieces would be 22×22″ for a 1/2″ seam allowance.

I cut 2 pieces of the chai print fabric and 2 peices for the lining.

Back

Then I had the pieces for the back which I am not 100% on the size, since I needed 2 pieces, factoring in seam allowance, overlap on the back and the hem on the one open side.

I cut 8 pieces total of this size. 4 from the blue waverly script fabric and 4 from my large piece of scrap fabric.

Cutting the Fabric

To cut out large patterns like this I use a very red neck method. (But it works well!) I get out leftover Christmas wrapping paper, measure and draw my pattern, then cut.

I lay the pattern over top the fabric and draw a straight line, then cut it out.

This method works really well with the wrapping paper that has the grid on the back to help you.

Sewing

Pinning and sewing is the fun part. I pinned the fabric pieces with their linings, wrong sides together and sewed all the way around with all 6 pieces.

Then I did the hem on the back pieces, (ironing first) where the edge envelope opening would be.

Then I put wrong sides together and sewed front pieces to the back pieces, taking care to triple stitch the parts where the edge of the back flap was. Then I turned it rightside out and stuffed in the pillows. I loooove the way they look.

And that’s that!

In the end this was what I had:

PicsArt_04-24-09.46.10

PicsArt_04-24-09.47.54

PicsArt_04-24-09.40.57

 

Cost:

It cost me about $10.40 to make these two pillow cases, or $5.20 per pillow case. That’s because the lining fabric I used was gifted to me from a friend. So I really only paid for roughly 2 yards, since the chai print I purchased as a scrap.

If I did buy that fabric, it would have added about $6 to the cost of the project.

Have you made any interesting home decor projects lately? Or have any plans to do one?

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 3, Main Dish)

PicsArt_03-16-02.43.37

Introduction

Hello and welcome back to the Global Eats series! This is country #2 in my new series.

 

Previously in the series on Morocco I shared:

Post #1-Global Eats: Morocco (Part 1, Intro)

Post #2-Global Eats: Morocco (Part 2, Condiment)

Check it out if you wish! Post #1 will give you a bit of background if you are not familiar with the food/culture of the country.

Goals for the Series

My intent is to answer 3 basic questions:

  1.  How do people in other countries save money on food?
  2.  What ingredients are staples in other countries?
  3. What new flavors will I learn about?

In my intro post, I covered question #2. I learned a lot about the common foods eaten and grown in Morocco.

And then in my last post, I shared my experience with preserving lemons. Why did I bother? Well because preserved lemons are awesome, obviously (nevermind the fact that I had no idea what they were for until I started reading about Morocco).

But mainly because I wanted to make tagine, and all Moroccan tagines call for preserved lemon.

 

The Main Dish: Moroccan Chicken, Apricot and Almond Tagine

The photos I’m sharing today are guided by the recipe for tagine which was created by The Daring Gormet.

Check out the site {via the link above} for the recipe 😊

And you may be wondering…ok so what is a tagine? Glad you asked!

marrakech-999370_1280

See the pots in the front that look like flower vases with a wide base? Those are tagines. They are cooking pots, for cooking..you guessed it. Tagines. How do they work?

tajines-1626986

A tagine has 2 pieces. The bottom part is a bowl and the top part is the lid. The food is cooked on the stove and then served as is.

The cool part about a tagine pot is that the shape is created so that the moisture rises and drips down back to the food, keeping it moist and tender. Much like a crockpot or a dutch oven. (I used the latter.)

You may be wondering where the tagine pot originally came from and who invented it. I’m not 100% sure on this one. Most sources said that nomads in North Africa used them, although no specific country or person was credited.

It’s a really cool invention huh? Kinda like the predecessor to the modern day crock pot. Super cool.

Cooking it Up

PicsArt_04-24-09.58.02

First of all, this was really good. Second of all there are 3 ingredients here that I want to spend a bit of time talking about.

Preserved Lemon

I talked about this in my previous post. I wasn’t 100% sure on why this was a necessary ingredient in tagine until I actually tried the dish.

I don’t know what the 4-week preserved lemons are supposed to taste like but I think the quick preserved lemons I used turned out well.

The recipe just called for 1/2 of a preserved lemon so I just added 2 pieces of it to the pot. I didn’t cut it up, just left it whole because I wasn’t so sure about eating it, to be honest.

Harissa

PicsArt_04-24-09.56.23

I purchased this harissa hot sauce from Amazon. I thought about making my own, but ended up not doing so because I couldn’t find the right kind of peppers.

The ingredients in the picture are tiny but it says “Rehydrated chilli 52%, water, modified starch corn, salt, garlic, coriander, caraway, acidity regulator: citric acid”.

And yep it is hot. I tried a very small amount and it tasted chock full of cayenne pepper. The recipe called for 1 Tablespoon of it which I thought might be too much…but it ended up being perfect and wonderfully balanced.

Couscous

PicsArt_04-24-09.54.33

I used this kind of couscous instead of following the directions in the recipe because I couldn’t find plain couscous at the store.

It ended up being really good and it went with the recipe pretty well. Garlic couscous is the way to go 😉

PicsArt_04-24-09.59.05

Alright back to the food.

Flavors

What did this dish taste like?

There were a lot, and I mean A LOT of flavors going on here. Let me break it down.

  • Spices. right away I could taste cinnamon, followed by turmeric. Cumin slightly.
  • Spicy. The harissa I could taste, but it wasn’t overly powerful. The spiciness was pleasant & lingered.
  • Sweet. there was definitely a sweet element with the raisins and butternut squash. I couldn’t taste or find the apricot but I’m sure it added to the sweetness as well.
  • Sour. I could taste the preserved lemon in places. I didn’t eat the actual pieces but the lemon flavor was definitely more mellow but still had that bright citrus taste.

Overall this was very good. I loved the complex flavor. The sweet and spicy was balanced. There was great texture with the chickpeas, butternut squash and dried fruit.

The slivered almonds added an unfamiliar crunch that I didn’t especially care for, and yet it didn’t make me want to stop eating 😋😋

Saving Money

The last element I want to briefly mention are the frugal aspects of this dish. Looking at this meal, you wouldn’t think it is frugal at first because it has 25 ingredients. I used 22 and 6 of those are seasonings.

Also, just want to mention that this makes a lot of food. Like 4 generous servings, at least.

Another thing I see here is that the ingredients with the larger amounts are pretty cheap. Butternut squash, couscous and garbanzo beans are all pretty inexpensive. 

Also, there was only 1 pound of chicken in the whole recipe. Adding chickpeas and almonds adds more protein and keeps the cost down.

Basically:

  • Lots of spices & seasonings
  • Small amounts of pricier food.
  • Keep expensive meats at minimum.
  • Add alternate sources of protein.
  • Bulk up on produce.

 

Conclusion

What I love about this series is that I (sometimes) think that people around the world are so different but I am everytime so pleasantly suprised that we are so similar and have so much in common.

There are differences in our surroundings, in our countries. But in the end we all just want good, delicious and frugal food.

Stay tuned for more Moroccan food! The next post will be either a side dish or dessert. Haven’t decided yet 😃

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Global Eats

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 2,Condiment)

PicsArt_03-16-02.43.37

On Wednesday (2 days ago) I mentioned that my next post on Moroccan food would be a condiment.

And so here we have…

Preserved Lemons!

I was really super intrigued by this idea of preserving citrus. I had read about the process in a preserving book last summer but didn’t attempt it, due to the fact that I had no real use for or ambition to use preserved lemons.

However, in reading through a lot of recipes for Moroccan tagine (slow cooked stew), almost all of them call for a bit of preserved lemon.

I was thinking, “What’s the big deal? Why does it need to be preserved lemon? Can’t I just use lemon juice or something..you know…easier?”.

But what I’m going for is that authentic Morroccan flavor. And as I learned last time with oyster sauce in the recipe for Philippine Ginisang Togue, flavor and authenticity is key.

And so I set out to find a recipe.

And ran into a problem.

Preserved lemons take 4 weeks to make. What?? Yeah. Regarding my time frame I had for the series, I did not have time to make it that way.

The Recipe

And luckily, I found a recipe for Quick Preserved Lemons, from myrecipes.com which has been a lifesaver.

And so I made the preserved lemons, because I was so wanting to make a tagine.

(Bear with me…my picture settings are being glitchy and not allowing me to write captions.)

PicsArt_04-24-10.05.51

I got 2 organic lemons from the store, cut them into quarters and added 2 Tablespoons sea salt (subbed for Kosher salt) and about 1 cup of water.

PicsArt_04-24-10.06.39

Afterwards. Looked kinda gross but smelled heavenly.

PicsArt_04-24-10.07.22

Right after I made it. I imagined the peels would soften as they sat in the salt and juices. (And they did.)

PicsArt_04-24-10.08.15

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.12.00

After sitting in the fridge for a few days. It looks oily but I think that’s just the mix of lemon pulp and saturated salty lemon juice.

PicsArt_04-24-10.13.05

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.09.15

All that remains here is the peel…the actual fruit part is super soft, almost like a cooked onion.

PicsArt_04-24-10.10.13

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.11.01

Lemony Thoughts

I didn’t actually try the lemons themselves but I did try a bit of the..(sauce?) they were preserved in. And I made a face. Because it was super-salty. And super-sour. Big suprise, right?

But it smelled heavenly. The most amazing, sunny and beautiful lemon fragrance.

And now I think I’m beginning to understand why preserved lemon had value. It’s just a way to prolong the harvest of a plentiful seasonal fruit. Much like we make applesauce or strawberry jam here in the U.S.

And I can also see how these lemons will add a bit of the sour in the sweet & sour cooking that is common in Morocco.

Stay tuned for my main dish post next week! It will hopefully be up on Tuesday.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Global Eats

Global Eats: Morocco (Part 1, Intro)

morocco-2697354__480

Introduction

Welcome back to the Global Eats series! This is a series I’ve been doing to help myself (and hopefully others) learn more about the value of food from other countries.

This is a…

  • cultural appreciation,
  • history lesson
  • and culinary education all rolled into one.

My last 4 posts were all about the Philippines. I shared my inspiration for the series in my first post Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 1, Intro).

Long story short, I read a post by another blogger and it inspired me to seek out the unique history, ingredients and flavors that are common in other cultures.

And let’s face it. It’s been a great way to distract from the winter blahs.

My intent in this series is to answer 3 basic questions:

  1. How do people in other cultures save money on food?
  2. What ingredients are staples in other countries?
  3. What new flavors will I learn about?

Question #2 will be answered in this post. The others I hope to answer by the end of this series on Morocco.

I am very excited to begin learning as much as I can about the foods that are popular and loved in different countries around the globe.

Disclaimer: I am not Moroccan but I will try my best to share what I have learned. To anyone who is Moroccan or is more knowledgeable on the topic, please feel free to share info or correct me if I am in error at any point in my posts.

 

History of Food & Melding of Cultures

morocco-2525290

Question: what is the history that shaped present day food dishes in Morocco?

Morocco is located in Northern Africa and borders the nations of Western Sahara and Algeria. Spain and Portugal lie quite close to it’s northern shores.

It has the Atlantic ocean on it’s western coast and a small part of the Mediterranean Sea on it’s northeastern side.

The food history of the country is a complex blend of the Berber people with Arabic, Moorish and French influences.

 

Berbers

As far as we know, the Berber people were the first to make their home in present-day Morocco. However, most peoples in the country today are a mix of Berber and Arabic ethnicities. The origin of the Berber people is difficult to trace. But we do know they ate things like olives, figs, dates, couscous and chickpeas (or garbanzo beans). All of these things are still staples today.

 

Arabs

The Arabs arrived next and their prominence lasted a little over 1,000 years, from about the 600’s A.D. to the 1700s. Morocco is still largely Berber/Arabic but influence-wise there was a break in political power.

From the Arabs, foods like spices from India and Asia were introduced (cinnamon, ginger, cumin, etc.). Also nuts and dried fruits along with a sweet and sour flavor common in Persian cooking.

 

photo-1517314815091-85f25384be22

Moores

The Moores came from Spain around 700 A.D. and were largely responsible for upping the consumption of olives, plus introducing olive oil and citrus trees and fruit.

 

The French

This part was new to me. In the early 1900s, the country of Morocco declared bankruptcy. This led to The Treaty of Fes, under which Morocco became a French colony until it’s independence in 1956. Oddly there wasn’t a lot of French culinary influence aside from the dessert and the whole café experience. Who doesn’t love French pastries? 😋😋

That covers the food history. So if you were to walk through Morocco today, what are some foods and ingredients that would stand out?

 

Common & Unique Ingredients

In my reading, there were 4 foods (plus a beverage) that I thought were rather unique. They were:

  • Argan oil
  • preserved lemons
  • harissa
  • and Ras El Hanout.
  • (Plus the very popular mint tea.)

What are these things and how are they eaten in Morocco?

photo-1474979266404-7eaacbcd87c5

 

Argan oil is made from the kernels of the argan tree. Argan trees are common in Morocco. So common that people will use the oil as a dip for bread.

I find this interesting because I use Argan oil as a facial moisturizer and it is neither easy to find nor cheap to buy in my particular area of the U.S.

 

photo-1518990371602-03cbe178adc8

 

Another common ingredient in Moroccan cooking is preserved lemons. I first heard of this from a canning and preserving book last summer. Now I know what it can be used in and where in the globe it is a common ingredient.

Preserved lemons are in various recipes but I think especially so in tagine, which is a special slow cooked stew.

 

photo-1506368249639-73a05d6f6488

 

Harissa and Ras El Hanout are two ingredients that add a bit of a spicy kick. Although they are popular in Morocco, they are also used overall in North African cusine.

Harissa is a thick, spicy sauce made from fresh and dried hot chili peppers and spices like caraway and cumin, among other ingredients.

Ras El Hanout translated means “top of shop”. It is a blend of as few as 10 and as many as 100 spices. I found a few recipes online but none that had more than 22 ingredients. I wouldn’t have thought to combine spices like cinnamon and allspice with coriander and turmeric but that is exactly what this recipe does.

 

mint-tea-1623112_1280
Mint tea is also a big deal in this country. It is served daily and  always served sweetened.

 

Tying it All Together

How to explain Moroccan food? From reading and research only I can see that this food as a whole is rich and complex.

I see sweet mixed with savory and lots of seasonings. Spices like ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg are combined with hot spices like cayenne and spices used in Indian cooking like turmeric and cumin. I think that this will make for some interesting flavors.

Besides spices, other common ingredients that I observed were things like chicken, almonds, carrots, chickpeas, raisins, lentils and onions.

 

Plans for the Moroccan Series

So what’s next? Next I am planning on writing 4 posts based on recipes for authentic Moroccan dishes. As of now, one will be a condiment, then a main dish, a side dish and finally a dessert with a beverage.

I am excited to begin this series and I look forward to the new recipes and flavors I will encounter.

The condiment dish I am planning on having up on the blog later this week. See you then!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Photo credit: All photos from pixabay and Unsplash.


 

Sources:

The Multicultural Cookbook for Students, by Carole Lisa Albyn and Lois Sinaiko Webb

~~

www.fescooking.com

The Art of Moroccan Cuisine: A Culture of Eating, Drinking, and Being Hospitable

~~

www.foodbycountry.com

Food in Every Country/Kazakhstan to South Africa/Morocco

~~

www.bbc.com

Africa-Morocco country profile

~~

www.infoplease.com

Morocco

~~

www.foodal.com

The Magic of Moroccan Cuisine

~~

http://www.thespruce.com

Collection of Authentic Moroccan Comfort Food Recipes

10 Famous Moroccan Dishes You Should Try

~~

www.mymoroccanfood.com

~~~

Desserts, Food

Yummy Fudgy Brownies {quick and healthy-ish}

PicsArt_04-06-10.24.00

It’s been a long time since I’ve posted any new recipes. I made these wonderful brownies yesterday because of my brownie-loving children. And ok, I’m guilty too.

I made them because the only way I could get my son to come inside was by bribing him with brownies. (It was in the 70s yesterday. Not common for February, but we weren’t complaining!)

So when we came inside, I needed something fast. And delicious of course. I looked up Rachael Ray’s Fast Fudgy Brownies but had to substitute and finangle a few things.

PicsArt_04-06-10.28.49

The end result turned out really well. My son didn’t seem bothered at all with the changes. All he wanted was brownies 🙂

These brownies have a dense, slightly chewy texture. The chia seeds add another element to the texture that I found myself enjoying. These brownies are wonderfully moist and delicious.

I will say these are a tad more salty than what I’m used to on account of the coconut sugar. Less sweetness means the saltiness isn’t as balanced. So I may try less coconut sugar or just use unsalted butter next time.

Still. We loved them 😊

PicsArt_04-06-10.29.47


 

Yummy Fudgy Brownies

Servings: about 8

Prep time: 15 minutes or less.

Bake time: 25 minutes.

 

Ingredients:

  • 4 Tablespoons/50g. butter
  • 6 Tablespoons/53g. cocoa powder
  • 2 Tablespoons/25g. shortening
  • 3/4 cup/105g. coconut sugar
  • 1/4 cup/35g. white/granulated sugar
  • 2 chia eggs**
  • 1/2 teaspoon/2mL vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup+2 Tablespoons/53g. white flour
  • 2 Tablespoons/18g. whole wheat flour

**I made 2 chia eggs following the directions from minimalist baker: 2 TBS/19g. chia seeds, 5 TBS/75mL water. Mix and let set till goopy.

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°/200°C. Grease and flour a 5×8″/12.5×20cm pan. (Or similar size.)
  2. Melt shortening, butter and cocoa powder in a small pan. Stir till smooth and melted.
  3. Add melted chocolate mixture to a bowl, along with sugars, chia eggs, vanilla and salt.
  4. Stir in flour. Empty thick batter into the prepared pan.
  5. Bake at 400°/200°C for about 25 minutes. Check for donness by inserting a thin knife, skewer or toothpick into the center. A clean utensil indicates doneness.

 

Cost:

This recipe cost me $2.97 to make. That’s 37¢ per serving (1 brownie).

Enjoy!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

***I wanted to do the measurements and baking temperature in metric because I know I have quite a few international readers and I wanted to make things easier. Let me know if any of my calculations are off if you find any errors, please and thank-you 😄

Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Kitchen Cupboard Closures {using fabric scraps & buckles}

PicsArt_02-15-06.18.03

Hi guys and welcome to Whipstitch Wednesday 😊 True, just like last time I’m posting on Thursday. But oh well. Maybe I’ll just do it that way from now on.

Anyways. So today I finished up my latest kitchen project, which was making buckle closures for my kitchen cabinets. I had sewn one for one set of cabinets but still needed to sew another.

The deal with kitchen cabinets is that young children need to be kept out of them because of various cleaning chemicals and such. But. The way in which these cabinets are sealed off from the kids needs to be kid-proof, yet easy for the adult to open.

In the past, we’ve been frustrated with the methods we’ve used so I brainstormed and decided on a buckle attached to a fabric strap.

So I made one and it’s worked marvelously. My youngest (nearly 2) cannot unbuckle the strap (so far), and it’s easy for my husband and I to undo. I don’t think my 4-year-old can do buckles yet either, now that I think of it.

So here is a tutorial of how I made these kitchen cupboard closures.


 

Kitchen Cupboard Closures

Difficulty: Easy (-ish)

Materials: Fabric scrap, matching thread, sewing machine (or sewing needle), pins, clothes iron, plastic buckle.

 

Instructions:

 

1. Cut out the fabric.

PicsArt_04-24-10.40.04

PicsArt_04-24-10.20.40

The dimensions of your fabric scrap will depend on the measurement around the handles of your kitchen cabinets. After you measure, add about 4 inches, plus 1 inch for turning down the ends.

So for example: 10″+4″+1″=15″.

This is the length.

The width will be 2.5-3″, fitting the slots in the buckle when ironed and doubled over.

 

2. Iron your fabric.

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.21.50

PicsArt_04-24-10.53.49

PicsArt_04-24-10.30.12

 

Place fabric right side down. Turn down fabric about 1/2″ on one long side. Iron down and repeat with other side.

Pin fabric, wrong sides together and slip into the buckle to ensure it fits. Un-pin and iron.

Then lastly, iron the short width ends, about 1/2″.

 

3. Sew it.

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.57.15

Sew the fabric on the long side that has the opening, about an 1/8″ from the edge. Repeat with other long side.

Turn short width end over and sew. Repeat with the other short end.

 

3. Buckle time.

 

PicsArt_04-24-10.33.36

PicsArt_04-24-10.34.45

Insert one buckle onto the finished strap. Sew as far away from the buckle as possible.

Check your measurements by sliding the strap through the kitchen cabinet handles. Pin the other buckle so that the strap will be tight but not too tight when buckled.

Now sew the other half of the buckle onto the strap.

PicsArt_04-24-10.36.18

PicsArt_04-24-10.39.00

All done! Good job 😄😄😄 Now you have a homemade kitchen cabinet closure that looks great and keeps out the little kiddos (we hope!)

If you do try this out, let me know if it works for you. Thanks! 😎

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Travel

5 Favorite Things {on our FL vacation}

PicsArt_02-09-04.56.13

 

1. The beach, of course!

PicsArt_04-24-11.11.22

We did a beach day yesterday and everyone absolutely loved it. How could we not? Sure there was sand everywhere and we all got a little burnt. But what is that compared to nature’s loveliness?

Something about the beach soothes my soul in a deep way. Beautiful, beautiful beach. We will miss you!

 

2. Knitting squares.

PicsArt_04-24-11.08.31

In my last post I mentioned that I was just learning to knit. For our vacation I decided to bring my knitting supplies so that I could knit on the long drive. I do have some traveling anxiety and this has been awesome to help with that. Knitting is very therapeutic 😊

 

3. A favorite read.

I’ve been reading quite a few different books on vacation but one of my most favorites has been Gift from the Sea, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

It is absolutely wonderful the way she combines the beachscape and different kinds of shells with just life and motherhood. It sounds like a simple concept and it is. I just really fell in love with her soothing, yet relevant writing style.

 

4. Local flora.

PicsArt_04-24-11.07.21

Some of you know I love looking at plants and studying them. This one seems to be very common in Florida. It is a weed but I still think it’s lovely.

After a quick bit of research I believe this is Bidens alba, also known as Spanish needles. Wikipedia says that the leaves are edible but I didn’t test that one out.

 

5. This salad.

PicsArt_04-24-11.10.23

This salad was 100% wonderful. We walked down to a produce stand where I bought beet greens and Florida strawberries and oranges, among quite a few other things. So good and way better than anything up north where I live.

I wish I would have taken a picture of the aloe vera leaf (for our sunburns) I bought before I cut it up. It was as long as my arm…and only 90¢!

Wishing you all warm and happy thoughts!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Sewing & Repurposing

Whipstitch Wednesday: Learning to Knit {winter goals}

PicsArt_02-01-04.40.05

I originally planned to post this yesterday, on Wednesday but a number of factors had a hand in the delay. Hope you enjoy it all the same! 😊

My Brief Absence & A Blogging Update

Hello everyone 🙂 First let me say sorry for my absence here on the blog and WordPress in general. I’m behind reading your posts and behind on my blogging schedule as well.

And it’s all because we got totally sick. It was so immensely not fun. The flu is no joke. I hope none of you get it but if you do you have my complete sympathy.

But anyways. Back to blogging stuff.

 

First of all, I wanted to say…

thank-you-944086_1280

A big thank-you to all of my readers because I made it to 100 followers 😊😊😊 Yay! Thanks so much you guys. You inspire me with your likes, your comments, your encouragement here on the blog (and some of you in real-life have been blog-encouragers as well). Many thanks. And here’s to more posts in the days ahead!

 

Introducing Whipstitch Wednesday

Today I’d like to introduce a new category I’m calling Whipstitch Wednesday.

I’ve been doing a ton of different sewing/stitchery projects and thought this would be a fun way to share things I’m doing, learning and any other helpful tips I’ve found.

One thing I’ve been doing lately is (trying) to learn to knit. It’s been a long-time goal of mine.

 

Found a New Hobby at the Hobby Lobby…

So a few weeks ago I went out with a friend to Hobby Lobby and bought some knitting needles. Then I got out some yarn (I’ve been using it for non-knitting projects) and attempted to started to knit. I consulted a ton of books btw, didn’t just pull this out of my brain of course.

PicsArt_04-24-11.15.32

PicsArt_04-24-11.16.40

After awhile, I got the knit stitch down. Although it looked too loose and I couldn’t figure out why…then just recently I learned that the big needles go with the big (thick) yarn. This was part of the reason I was so frusterated with my knitting.

PicsArt_04-24-11.23.24 PicsArt_04-24-11.26.31

Sweet Success

PicsArt_04-24-11.29.01

PicsArt_04-24-11.30.49

I’m so happy 👏👏😄😄 It was hard to get the hang of it but I’m proud of my efforts.

The yarn I used is Red Heart Super Saver in Monet. I think it would be classified as a “worsted” yarn. So better suited for size 6 needles, from what I’ve read, instead of my size 13 needles.

I happened upon a yarn site (loveknitting.com) that was having a sale soooo….yeah I’m hooked. Planning tons of projects. As if I need any more sewing projects haha. Oh well can never have too many. It’s great therapy and perfect for these icky winter days.

Have you been doing any winter sewing projects to de-stress? Do you knit or want to learn someday?

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05


 

P.s.- I found these two videos helpful for learning how to purl.

~*~

How To Do a Purl Stitch Knitting, by Howcast

 

~*~

How to Purl – p Stitch Beginner, by GoodKnitKisses

Reflections

The pain in the quiet, healing flow

photo-1502298627803-72ee3e0b4f54

Good afternoon everyone! I mentioned in my last poem post that I wanted to share some more recent poetry.

So today I’m opening up and sharing some of the difficult moments and emotions of motherhood.

Motherhood isn’t all hard days. But then wow. Some days hit you and the emotions are through the roof.

I wrote this last November when I was going through some very hard moments. Internally all these emotions were fighting to get out. To be heard and dealt with.

I never write to be pitied. I write to put struggle to page. Sorrow to ink. I write so that what is broken can begin to be mended.

Maybe this will strike a cord with someone. I hope this sharing of personal struggle can minister to someone’s soul and spirit.

photo-1493895373845-e29753c52043

Still Mother

 

In real pain

Do we mother.

Do we act

And do we slumber.

 

A hot tear dashed away

When no one can see

The pain that it is

To mother.

 

When the days stick

Together.

Mind wrapped in fog

Thicker and thick.

 

Yelling names

Crushing my heart

Over and over

I endeavor to teach.

To teach what it means

To be kind.

 

Be kind to me.

For my job is not easy.

I’m full of wounds

But I know how

To heal.

 

He taught me once

He teaches still.

 

The pain that it is to mother.

Oh child, be still.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

This poem is my own. All pictures are from Unsplash.

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 4, Dessert)

PicsArt_01-12-05.33.36

Welcome to Part 4 of my Global Eats series! This has been a series of posts focused on the food and culture of the Philippines.

Brief Re-cap

Previously in this series I shared:

Post #1-Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 1, Intro)

Post #2-Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 2, Main Dish)

Post #3-Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 3, Sauce & Side Dish)

Feel free to check out the other posts, if you wish. Part 1 is an introduction post to the series, with some background info on the food of the Philippines. Last Saturday I shared Part 3, which proved to be unexpectedly delicious.

Today we have…..

Filipino-Style Flan (Leche Flan)

If you google flan, you will soon see there are many different types of it. So what makes Filipino flan unique?

From what I’ve read, it is the eggs. Filipino flan calls for egg yolks only, not the whole eggs. This makes a richer and denser dessert. To me this makes it more like a custard-style dessert.

(Side note: Flan came to the Philippines from Spain because Spain colonized the country from 1565-1898.)

Making the Flan

Psst….

I have never made flan before. 😝

It was a bit tricky. In this post you will see some imperfect flans. But this isn’t a cooking show..no competition here. Just lots of learning and fun 🙂

Recipe

Most recipes for flan call for evaporated milk and sweetened condensed milk. Since I cannot have dairy milk, I sought out a recipe that gave a substitute.

The recipe I used is from the blog Grain-Free Belle.

(Yep. This flan is gluten-free and dairy-free.)

The recipe called for 3 beaten eggs and 4 egg yolks. It made a ton of filling. It also called for rice or hemp milk, but I decided to try something different.

I took a chance and used coconut milk. I thought it would be neat to use coconut milk in a Filipino recipe because coconut is a popular ingredient there.

20170718_160241-1
Aroy-D is the brand that I used. It is the same brand that I used for my coconut yogurt.

Flan Batch #1

20180111_145110

For my first batch, I made the carmel syrup and my custard far too thick. Of course I didn’t know this until the end…and the recipe didn’t really extrapolate on how full to fill the molds.

It did say to use ramekins, which I did not have, wasn’t going to buy. So I used 8oz mason jars.

20180111_161431
The result: a rather thick, half-formed flan.

20180111_161419

 

Flan Batch #2

20180112_140825
Lesson learned…thinner flan.
20180112_151248-1
One of the better looking ones…looks kinda like a scallop.

20180112_151307-1

20180112_151031
This was my best-formed flan. The top cracked but the shape was good 🙂

20180112_151434

 

Taste

Ok but what did it taste like? Well, T.R. you are right. Flan is a bit bland. To me, this flan tasted fairly similar to custard pie. The caramel sauce added a nice element to the dessert.

Texture

Rich tasting. Smooth. A bit of a velvety texture.

It was a bit like sweetened scrambled eggs. But smoother, if that makes sense. It was good, but not particularly my cup of tea.

Flavor

Sooo sweet. For me it was an almost overpowering sweetness. Creamy, sweet desserts are not really my thing. Unless it’s chocolate! Haha.

A bit of carmel taste, a smidge of vanilla. But mostly a rich creamy flavor. I couldn’t especially taste the coconut.

 

Conclusion

Ginisang Togue. Banana Sauce with Rice and Leche Flan.

Thus ends the Filipino edition of my Global Eats series. Hope you’ve enjoyed our journey through the Philippines!

It’s been far from a complete culinary experience but I’ve had a lot of fun learning about so many unique dishes and flavors. And I’ve enjoyed sharing some of what I’ve learned with you guys. 🙂

The next country will probably not begin until 2 weeks from now. I’m still deciding if I want to do a European or Middle-Eastern country. And you know. Preparation and all that fun stuff.

 

Take care & stay warm!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 3, Sauce & Side Dish)

PicsArt_01-12-05.33.36

Welcome to Part 3 of my Global Eats series! This has been a series of posts focused on the food and culture of the Philippines.

Previously in this series I shared:

Post #1-Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 1, Intro)

Post #2-Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 2, Main Dish)

Check it out if you wish! Post #1 will give you a bit of background if you are not familiar with the food/culture of the Philippines.

Today’s post is all about…..

Banana sauce!

I talked a little bit about banana sauce (also known as banana ketchup) in post #1. I mentioned 3 foods unique to the Philippines: ube (purple yam), calamansi (citrus fruit) and banana sauce.

I’ve read that one of the things that banana sauce goes really well with is rice. 

Ok. No problem.

I made the banana sauce first. (Recipe from Serious Eats) It wasn’t too difficult to make. There were quite a few ingredients and about 20 minutes cook time but nothing too hard.

I did leave out the jalapeno and substituted the rum for water. And after cooking, cooling and blending I got this:

20180112_120700-1
I think it looks like peanut butter.

Then I made up some brown Basmati rice. I think steamed rice is more of a thing in Asian countries but I don’t have the proper equipment for that so the rice was cooked my usual way.

20180112_171243-1

 

20180112_171309-1

 

20180112_171501-1

 

And you know, I won’t lie…I was fully expecting to not like this.

The sweet banana flavor, mixed with savory, salty, tomato paste, vinegar and ginger? Plus seasonings like allspice? I was not too sure about this.

But you guys…guess what?

20180112_171508-1

It was incredibly delicious. I had 2 bowls. Seriously.

I’m not sure what it was. It truly did have a ketchupy taste to it. The sweetness I could taste right away, then a combination of flavors, the vinegar and then I could definitely taste a tiny bit of the cloves in the aftertaste.

It is amazing. On its own it was ok. But with rice somehow it was really delicious.

What a cheap and easy way to spruce up a cheap bowl of rice, right? I usually just have butter and salt on mine, or the usual serve it with stir-fry (the Americanized version) or whatnot.

Yum.

Ever had banana sauce on rice? 100% recommend 😄

Stay warm out there!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

p.s.-Next post (and last from this country) will be a special Filipino style dessert 🍮 I’m planning on having it up on Tuesday. Enjoy your weekend!

Food, Snacks

Easy Strawberry-Apple Fruit Leather

PicsArt_01-10-05.34.42

Howdy ya’ll 🙂 Just checking in on this fine Wednesday evening from my beautiful corner of the globe here in the midwestern U.S. Its been super cold lately…one evening it was even -16 with the windchill. Way too cold.

Some of you guys might have even colder winters than that though. I follow a Canadian blogger who said it was like -34 where she lives. What?? How do you even?! Yikes. It’s no wonder people are so incredibly happy come Spring.

Oh Spring! Come early this year! Please do!

Alright enough of my belly-aching and onto the real stuff.

20170918_160309

I don’t know if you remember my post on preserving apples, but in it I included the above picture.

Know what I did with all the peels and leftover bits of puree? Yep I put it all in the blender, made a puree and froze it.

Because I knew I wanted to make fruit leather with my dehydrator.

However…I couldn’t at the time because I had lost my fruit leather tray and was too lazy to find/think up/buy a replacement. So I found it. Yay! That’s what happens when you deep clean 🙂

Now I could finally make some! I took a big tub of apple puree and added it, along with some frozen organic strawberries to my blender to mix it. My ratio was 3 cups apple to 1 cup chopped frozen strawberries.

20180104_140350

20180110_132627-1
This is the puree about halfway through the 4-6 hour drying process.
20180109_182954-1
Dry texture ontop when finished.
20180109_183317-1
Shiny texture on bottom when done. My edges were a bit too thick and didn’t dry properly.
20180109_184140-1
Cut off the underdone parts and the remainder into strips with kitchen scissors.

20180109_184247

20180110_131817-1

These make for a super-delicious snack. My almost 2-year-old daughter agrees. And why not? These fruit strips taste just like candy. They store well too. But that point is irrelevant because they won’t last long!

Do you like fruit leather? Have you ever tried it or maybe made your own at home? If so, what flavors are your favorite? I’d love to try some different flavor combos 😋 🍏🍓🍑🍒

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

Sewing & Repurposing

Repurposing Receiving Blankets to Make a Toddler Quilt {for Under $35}

20171128_232242-1

Ever wanted to make a baby or toddler quilt but don’t know quite where to start? How about with something you probably already have…

I made my first-ever quilt last month. First. ever. And guess what? It cost me less than $35 to make. 

But the best part is that this toddler quilt is not only a sewing project but a repurposing one as well.

I looked at a huge stack of flannel receiving blankets awhile ago and wondered what on earth to do with them. I thought about throwing them out…using them as rags. But no. They still had some use. A lot of them were cute prints.

Then I thought…

Quilt.

Yes I will make my daughter a toddler quilt. She will be transitioning to a toddler bed soon and a new quilt will be nice to have.

I wanted to share the process I went through to make this quilt. So the following post will be largely composed of pictures for your viewing pleasure.

So here you go. 2 ½ months of work squeezed into just a few minutes! Enjoy fellow sewers, crafters, repurposing junkies and lovers of art!

20171011_225450
To begin, I cut out 300 little 4″ squares and laid them out in a design. The quilt will be 20 squares long and 15 squares wide.

 

20171116_163009-1
Then I stacked up the rows and labeled each row.

 

20171116_163042-1

 

20171116_163934
They were pinned, 2 at a time.

 

20171126_180919-1
Then those groups of 2’s were sewn together till each row of 20 was sewn. This part was pretty time consuming.

 

20171126_182355-1
Now I’m ready to start sewing rows together.

 

20171126_182426-1
I started with row 1 and 2 and pinned right sides together.

20171126_190313

 

20171126_232832
Yeah woot look at that!

 

20171126_232817
Except the backside was totally messed up. And I only realized about halfway through sewing ALL of the rows. Time to re-do 😦

 

20171128_220328-1
Now 2 rows have been sewn together for rows 1-20.

 

20171128_232242-1

 

20171129_113453-1
Then those rows of 2 were sewn together, giving me rows of 4. At this point, the quilt top is in 5 peices.

 

20171129_123135-1
One more seam will complete the quilt top, joining the 2 peices.

 

20171129_124129
Sewing the last seam!

 

20171129_131600
Completed quilt top.

 

20171129_131659
The back.

 

20171129_132913
At this point I got out my flannel backing and the pieces of the old quilt I had cut apart and assembled the quilt.

 

20171129_132920
Then I took out the quilt top and ironed the back peices down flat.

 

20171203_223212-1
About to cut the inner layers to size right against the quilt top. (Notice my cat in the bottom right hand corner. Cats love it when you lay a quilt on the floor.)

 

20171203_234933-2
Complete!

 

20171208_183731-1
Then one of the most nerve-wrecking parts, cutting the flannel piece to the proper size and pinning. I had to cut, fold, pin and then re-do to get it right.

 

20171208_183741-1
Notice my daughter trying to pick out the pins. She did that the whoooolllee time!

 

20171208_190817
Finally. Here I am sewing the last side of the quilt.

 

20180104_124437-1
The last step was tying the ties. About 150 of them, which took longer than I anticipated. And yep the quilt has been well loved and thus the wrinkles.

 

20180104_124607-1
Back of the quilt. The ties go through all layers of the quilt and hold everything together. It also makes for a more “flexible” blanket.

 

20180104_124648-1
I love the swirling pattern.

 

20180104_124950-1
Close-up of the nursery print with a tie.

 

20180104_125102-1

 

20180104_125120-1
Love this print.

 

It was a relief to finally finish this project just a few days before Christmas. I made a few flukes but I don’t really care. The proof is in the pudding, as they say and I think I have a good one.


 

Price breakdown

 

Thread

4 spools beige thread @ $2.90 each= $11.60

2 embroidery floss (60¢ each)=$1.20

Fabric (all new)

-Flannel fabric, for backing, 53″ wide× 64 ½” long= $12.90

(This was from a 110″×54″ peice, or 1 ½ yards.)

-Nursery print flannel fabric, 1 yd= $7.50

Free stuff

-Roughly 8yds (1 yd each color/pattern) of flannel solids & prints.

-inner layer of the quilt from 2 layers of an old quilt.

 

Total cost= $33.20


 

God Bless & stay warm! It’s a cold one out there for sure…it’s been 20 or below here in the midwest for for-ev-er. (So it seems. Probably 10 days at most.) I can not wait for it to warm up!

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

***Measurements: This finished quilt measures 49″ wide × 60 ½” long

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 2, Main Dish)

PicsArt_01-12-05.33.36

Welcome back to the Global Eats series! Last week I posted Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 1, Intro).

This is Part 2, out of 3 or 4 total posts.

Re-cap

To re-hash, this is what inspired the series:

I wrote in my latest blogging update post that I wanted to make a variety of dishes that are common in other countries and cultures. This idea was inspired in part by a post from the blog My No-Fuss Kitchen.

The blogger shared how she saved money by making Chinese-Malaysian stir fry dishes out of leftover ingredients.

My intent is to answer 3 basic questions:

  1. How do people in other cultures save money on food?
  2. What ingredients are staples in other countries?
  3. What new flavors will I learn about?

So in my last post I covered #2. I learned a lot about the foods of the Philippines and I still have more to learn! I’m amazed at just how much there is to learn.

And I just love it. I love learning this stuff.

The Main Dish: Ginisang Togue

20171219_173631

Ok so the photos I am sharing today are guided by the recipe for Ginisang Togue which is from the website Authentic Filipino Recipes.

So check out the site for the recipe 🙂

The words “Ginisang Togue” mean “sauteed mung bean sprouts” in Tagalog. So that must be the main ingredient, right?

Right.

I hadn’t made sprouts before but I heard it was easy. Can I get mung beans in the US? Yes I could.

Making the sprouts

I purchased a sprouting jar lid for $4.75 and 4oz organic mung bean sprouts seeds for $3.79 from iherb.com.

20171213_165515-1
All you need to make sprouts: quart mason jar, sprouting lid, sprouting seeds and water. (Plus a bowl and a towel.)
20171218_124826-1
I wanted some longer sprouts so I rinsed and drained every 12 hours for 5 days.
20171218_125003-1
Ta-da! Sprouts!

 

Time to Cook!

20171219_171245-1

 

The recipe called for a lot of veggies. Garlic, onions, red and green bell peppers, sprouts and carrots.

It also called for tofu, which I didn’t use. I just used extra shrimp because I try to stay away from soy products.

20171219_171329

So a little bit about these ingredients. The recipe called for a large tomato, cubed. I didn’t have one and wasn’t about to run to the store just for that. So I used part of a can of my homemade crushed tomatoes.

I also used a bit of chicken flavored soup base instead of the chicken cube.

What is oyster sauce? 

According to The Spruce, “Oyster sauce is a thick, brown sauce with a sweet, salty, and earthy flavor. Oyster sauce is a popular ingredient in Vietnamese, Thai, and Cantonese cuisine.”

A good kind will be something like a combo of oysters, salt and soy sauce.

Mine was not high-quality and did not contain oysters. However, being many miles from acquiring good quality oysters, and also not seeing these recipes till just now, bottled “oyster” sauce was what happened.

To me, it just tasted like thick, slightly sweet soy sauce. Boo. Still, it made for decent flavor.

20171219_173615
The final product.

Flavors

What did this dish taste like?

There were a few different flavors going on. There was sweet, from the red bell peppers and carrots. Salty, from the soy sauce, oyster sauce and chicken soup base. And the sprouts, to me were a bit bitter, but just from the seed part. There wasn’t any big pop of flavor but I think all of the ingredients complimented each other.

Definitely an interesting flavor combo and a wonderful texture. I tried to keep the veggies slightly raw and that made for a nice crunch. I enjoyed eating this and I would make it again.

Saving money

To me, this recipe is frugal because…

  • Lots of veggies are added. And veggies are cheap. The ones used here I can buy year-round.
  • Sprouts are also easy to make yourself and cheap. Mine cost me about 95¢ for this recipe.
  • Rice is always a frugal ingredient that can feed a crowd.
  • Protein, starch and veggie in one dish makes for an easy meal. Yay easy!

Just a tiny peek into the flavors and ingredients of a Filipino dish 🙂 Not 100% authentic but a fun experience all the same.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05


 

Resources:

www.tagaloglang.com

Toge

~

www.recipeland.com

Homemade Oyster Sauce

~

www.thespruce.com

What Is Oyster Sauce?

Motherhood

Stinky, Poopy Diapers {and what they’ve taught me about being a mom}

alex-pasarelu-223684

I really hate poopy diapers. Not always, mind, but much of the time.

It happens at inconvenient times. At least, inconvenient to me.

As if to prove this point my daughter, reeking of dirty diaper, sat down right next to me as I began this post.

So I got up to change her, as I always do. As must be done. As is my duty as a mother.

But let me ask you. As a mother, do you ever feel resentment when confronted with this? Frusteration? Feel inconvenienced?

Sometimes I forget that my daughter is not toliet-trained like her brother. And giving her the care she needs seems hard.

Maybe that’s the seasonal depression talking. It happens in the winter. I know I’m not the only one in that. I know that January is a hard month to be a mom. Fyi It’s often difficult to blog during this month. When its cold and when isolation and sickness bring challenges.

daniel-watson-75027

But that is not the point of this post.

Awhile ago I started reading Desperate: Hope for the Mom Who Needs to Breathe, by Sarah Mae and Sally Clarkson. I fought with the idea of reading it. I knew reading would push me, change me. And I didn’t know if I was ready for that.

But finally, 10 chapters in I feel like I am getting somewhere. And I feel like I’m maybe beginning to learn.

Ok, but what’s that to do with poopy diapers?

“The ability to last in motherhood requires giving up expectations for our own lives, deciding that sacrificing our desires and wants for the sake of our family is our gift of worship to our heavenly Father.”

-from Desperate, Chapter 10 by Sarah Mae and Sally Clarkson

One day after reading the bulk of chapter 10, I looked at my daughter who had decided to fill up her britches. I was im the middle of something, but instead of feeling inconvenienced I felt a mental shift. I found I could manage a smile instead of a frown.

This is not always the way of things. I am no Mary Poppins. Human I am, human I will remain. But that brief blip. That small, slight shift. I hope it will become more and more a part of me as I seek to treasure my children. Treasure not just the happy and the beautiful moments but also the difficult, the hard times.

Not because I’m some kind of higher-than-thou person. But because to learn to treasure my role as a mother I need to continually learn the art that is shining light where there is dark. A smile in the face of a challenge. Gladness of heart in the face of trying circumstances.

roses-2604270

Motherhood is balance. And I think what I’ve most struggled with is the idea that to be a good mom, I need to give up on taking care of me. Which is misplaced. I don’t have to give that up to be a good mom. It’s not my time or my self-care that needs to go but my negative thinking that damages my relationship with these sweet babies I love so much.

Perfect mom syndrome? Haha far from it! (A fly on the wall today would have seen something else entirely.) But I’m learning. One step at a time 🙂

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

 

All photos are from Unsplash.

Food, Global Eats

Global Eats: The Philippines (Part 1, Intro)

PicsArt_01-12-05.33.36

Introduction

Welcome to the first post of my Global Eats series! This is a series I’ve been planning to help myself (and hopefully others) learn more about the value of food from other countries. This is a cultural appreciation, history lesson and culinary education all rolled into one.

I wrote in my latest blogging update post that I wanted to make a variety of dishes that are common in other countries and cultures. This idea was inspired in part by a post from the blog My No-Fuss Kitchen.

The blogger shared how she saved money by making Chinese-Malaysian stir fry dishes out of leftover ingredients.

My intent is to answer 3 basic questions:

  1. How do people in other cultures save money on food?
  2. What ingredients are staples in other countries?
  3. What new flavors will I learn about?

Question #2 will be answered in this post. The others I hope to answer by the end of this series on the Philippines.

I am very excited to begin learning as much as I can about the foods that are popular and loved in different countries around the globe.

Disclaimer: I am not Filipino but I will try my best to share what I have learned. To anyone who is Filipino or is more knowledgeable on the topic, please feel free to share info or correct me if I am in error at any point in my posts.

 

History of Food & Melding of Cultures

rice-fields-2806859

Question: what is the history that shaped present day food dishes in the Philippines?

Because the Philippines has a tropical climate, and because of its location in the Pacific and southeast Asia there are foods like coconut, bananas and rice that were well established in the country.

Then there are influences from neighboring countries. The Philippines are close to China, especially but also Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia. Trade and the mixing of cultures helped introduce new foods to the Filipino people.

Filipino-Chinese Food

From China there was an introduction to noodles, vegetables in a wrapper (like spring rolls or eggrolls), also things like steamed and filled buns and dumplings were incorporated into the Filipino diet.

Fil-Hispanic Food

One of the most unexpected things I found was that certain types of food have Spanish and even Mexican influences.

The Philippines were colonized by Spain for 333 years (1565-1898). Throughout this time dishes like flan (a custard-like dessert) and Paella (a seasoned rice dish with meat/seafood) were introduced and recipes were slightly modified.

flowers-274820

When I think of food in a specific country, I tend to (wrongly) think that the food there will be unique to and consistent throughout the country.

What I’ve found instead is that a country typically has many dishes that are not initially from that particular country. And within that country, dishes will vary by region.

That being said, there are a few foods that are unique specifically to the Philippines.

Common & Unique Ingredients in the Philippines

Three totally unique ingredients I’ve learned about:

  • banana ketchup
  • calamansi
  • ube

What are these things??

220px-Banana_ketchup
Banana ketchup (advertised as banana sauce). source: Wikipedia

The story here is that when the US “met” with the Philippines, certain foods like ketchup were introduced. Tomatoes are not as common there, so a sauce was made using bananas. The ingredients are similar, but banana ketchup is sweeter. Read more here if you’re curious.

 

calamansi-2312164
Calamansi. Called calamondin in the US. Said to be similar to a lemon or lime in flavor. source: Pixabay

Calamansi fruit or juice was one ingredient that I saw in Filipino recipes over and over. It is available in the country in all seasons and has a pleasantly tart taste (like a lemon-lime combo), I’ve heard.

Most recipes I saw had pictures of the green fruit but when calamansi are ripe, they look like a tangerine. Very unique, beautiful fruit.

 

Kaachil_cut
Ube. Also called purple yam. source: Wikipedia

Another incredibly gorgeous food found in the Philippines is ube. It is naturally colored purple yam that is found most often in desserts. Google ube ice cream. Gorgeous. I totally want to grow some!

 

Tying it All Together

How to explain the flavors of Filipino food? I’m not Filipino and my knowledge is limited. I only know what I’ve read from others that are Filipino and have tried those foods they have written about.

I saw ingredients like rice, shrimp, onions, bell peppers, garlic, soy sauce, carrots, pork and fish sauce over and over. 

My general impression is that there is a lot of pork, chicken or shrimp cooked along with a lot of veggies in a somewhat simple sauce. There wasn’t a lot of the seasonings I’m used to, like oregano and thyme.

What I’ve read is that Filipino food doesn’t have heavy seasonings like we might have here in the US. Flavor comes from liquid sauces..not often made of tomatoes either.

 

Plans For the Series

As I go on in this series on Filipino food, I hope to more accurately describe the flavors I taste. The textures. The new ingredients I’ve used and the fun that I’ve had trying it all out.

Currently I plan on making and posting about 2-3 Filipino dishes. At least one will be a main dish and the other 1-2 will be a side, sauce or dessert.

This is as close as I can get to physically trying Filipino food in the Philippines. I am not a global food expert, but in doing this Global Eats series I hope to educate myself and learn a bit about the good food from other countries around the world.

PicsArt_03-05-12.26.05

All photos unless otherwise noted are from Pixabay.


 

Sources:

The Multicultural Cookbook for Students, by Carole Lisa Albyn and Lois Sinaiko Webb

~

www.buzzfeed.com

24 Delicious Filipino Foods You Need In Your Life

~

www.foodrepublic.com

Banana Ketchup: The Philippines’ Answer To A Lack Of TomatoesCondiment of the Week: Filipino Banana Ketchup

~

www.asian-recipe.com

The Philippines-Then and Now

~

Wikipedia

Calamondin

Yam (vegetable)

~

www.authenticfilipinorecipes.com

~

Junblog

~